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Since then, the number of prostitution-related calls along what cops call "The Avenue" has jumped 17 percent, and neighbors are clamoring for help.They say they've been inundated with signs of the sex industry, from condoms and needles in the street to Madison High School students getting solicited on their way home."How many women out there would get into a strange guy's car on 82nd Avenue if they weren't a prostitute?" None of the women seemed interested in leaving the business. As they waited for the officers to run their names through a crime computer, they rolled their eyes, checked their cell phones and smoked."The prostitutes and pimps threaten that." Historically, east Portland hasn't enjoyed much political clout or received much attention from City Hall.It shows in the lack of streetlights, paved roads and sidewalks.The ones from California dress up, paint their nails, strap on the highest of heels and position their wigs with a professional's precision.

Meetings and a march Monday: Neighbors will talk about what they're seeing on 82nd Avenue and hear from police, former prostitutes, business owners and other experts at the first of two anti-prostitution town halls -- 6 p.m. at the Portland Community College campus on the corner of Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Division and will head north along the avenue. "The mayor lifted that ban last year, and the girls all know.To the casual traveler, prostitution can seem subtle. In surrounding neighborhoods, residents have learned to leave their front porch lights on to ward off couples looking for a secluded place to park.Inexpensive apartment complexes near 82nd offer pimps -- including many older gang members who police say abandoned drug dealing for less violent crime -- a place to coordinate their empires.Since midsummer, Officers Michael Stevens and Randi Miller have patrolled the avenue four nights a week on a temporary prostitution detail. Stuff that you might not notice if you weren't actively looking for it." One night last week, Stevens and Miller stopped nine women during a 10-hour patrol that included breaks to respond to a car-bike collision, chase down a driver who had left a suspected drug house and wolf down Mexican food. Several said they weren't working on that night, but slid into a strange car because they'd lost their cell phone or needed a ride."Ah, yes, the 'I-needed-a-ride' defense," Stevens said after one encounter.

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